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Stored Purpose - Philosophy of the Mind

Stored Purpose - a new approach to computing leveraging the current capability of information science

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Warren Jones, Lana Rubalsky (2010) "Stored Purpose - Philosophy of the Mind", wJones Research, October 8, 2010
To design Stored Purpose, we had to assert answers to many philosophical questions, such as the natures of Existence, Reality and Intelligence. Taking a lesson learned from the difficult path of Artificial Intelligence, we decided to avoid the “top-down” approach of defining a mind with “human-only” qualities, i.e. the differences between chimp and man. Instead we opted to “work our way up,” first defining the differences between a rock and rice grass. This lead us to focus on creating fundamental mechanics of Goal Pursuit, Universal knowledge, existence and the development of the Existence model architecture (Ema). Ema was a gold mine, as it could be used to design almost anything, using a simple trick called recursion.

Keep in mind that although we use terms with analogs in biology, such as cellular Ema, cortical Mica, and genetic Identity, what we describe is a machine design, not a human one. And the architectures we describe are simply the only ones we were able to devise that will work. So nature may prove to be very different, and we may find more efficient methods in the future. Only time will tell how similar the stored purpose architecture and human biology will prove to be.

Figure - Questions of Philosophy<br />The design of Stored Purpose required answers to many key questions from the domain of Philosophy, albeit from a different perspective.  Rather than questioning the nature of the human mind, we sought to develop a mind we could construct, first able to know any one thing.

Figure - Questions of Philosophy
The design of Stored Purpose required answers to many key questions from the domain of Philosophy, albeit from a different perspective. Rather than questioning the nature of the human mind, we sought to develop a mind we could construct, first able to know any one thing.

The Nature of a Mind

Development of the metacomputer agent required a complete answer to the question, “What is a mind?” Our agent minds are not human and certainly do not represent a design for all minds, but they do offer a complete and transparent architecture for the study of a mind. And once you have an architecture for any mind, in it’s context, you gain answers to all the key philosophical questions.

Possibly the most important philosophical question about the mind is whether it is a simple physical machine, i.e. brain and nervous system, or if there is something more. Those that believed in the simple brain machine model, i.e. what we see is what we get, are called monist. Those that believed there is something beyond the physical construction of the brain are called dualist. Philosophers have been split over the years, but most today supporting the monist view.

Fields of Study

There are two primary fields of study related to the mind:
  • The most recent is neuroscience, which studies the specific technical implementation of a mind in the human brain and nervous system. Students of this approach are typically monists, believing mind and body are one, and the physical expression of the brain will fully reveal the general natures of the mind.
  • The older and broader approach is analytic philosophy, which attempts to define and understand the general natures of the mind and consciousness. Work in this field has created a rich history of inquiry, thought and questions important to establishing a greater understanding of the mind. A principle question within this field has been whether the mind’s design is based upon simple physics, or might there be components beyond the physical, i.e. a dualist two-part metaphysical mind construct.

Figure - Stored Purpose Dualist mind-body Design, or is it Tri•ist?<br />The two timespace theory underlying Ema and a Stored Purpose mind ties closely with a property dualism approach to the mind-body problem.  Yet the importance of Translation in the dual Mica and Cortical architecture in human level intelligence may suggest a tri•ism model.
Figure - Stored Purpose Dualist mind-body Design, or is it Tri•ist?
The two timespace theory underlying Ema and a Stored Purpose mind ties closely with a property dualism approach to the mind-body problem. Yet the importance of Translation in the dual Mica and Cortical architecture in human level intelligence may suggest a tri•ism model.
Early Hindu philosophies, Plato and Descartes, supported a dualist belief in a mind constructed with elements beyond the physical brain, but scientific success at describing all outcomes as a sum of local forces, prompted a steady shift, starting with Spinoza, toward a monist belief that the mind was no more than the physical brain and nervous system.

Stored Purpose’ Ema design is clearly dualist, as it splits the mind into a physical Expression timespace, in which we exist, and a separate metaphysical Construction timespace, which parts only intersect with our physical space as the agent traverses Context, at time Now. That said, some will argue that the fact that we’ve been able to “hack” Construction, and build Stored Purpose as a single local physical system, answers the major assertion of monists.

Thus despite the objective and transparent architecture of Stored Purpose, its nature may still be fodder for philosophical debate. Agent minds will likely be classified in one several ways, dependent upon the beliefs of each philosopher, with respect to the nature timespace.
  • Those who believe in the multiple timespace model, yet consider the Construction timespace and genetic Identity to be simple phenomena of our local physical universe, will classify Stored Purpose minds as “property dualism.”
  • Those who don’t believe in timespaces, and consider the General intelligence algorithm (Gia) and genetic Identity to be simply new ways to write software, will classify it as “physicalist monism.”
  • Finally those who believe in timespace theory and see genetic Identity as something more than its physical manifestation, will classify Stored Purpose minds as “substance dualism.”
The inventors support the property dualism classification.

In addition to the mind-body problem, it is possible to use the Stored Purpose architecture to answer all questions of analytic philosophy. Only time will tell how similar Stored Purpose and nature really are. Here are a few samples:

Q. What’s the connection between cognition and music?
A. Design of Platonic knowledge required development of a special type of information called a “shape graph.” This is a logarithmic graph used to store shape and sequence in a Stored Purpose mind. The best design for this proved to be almost identical to scientific music notation, a means to record the structure of any music. This means that in a Stored Purpose mind, music is the same in Construction and Expression, and listening requires no translation. It also means that the shapes and sequence of of any memory could be written as a song. This means that listening songs can can trigger recollection of shapes and sequences that could be connected to any memory or knowledge in a mind.

Q. What causes emotion?
A. An inability to plan, or more specifically, impairment of translation from Construction to Plan. Plan is a type of memory to which the predicted states of Expression are written. When there is a failure of the plan function, planning becomes subject to scheduling. The secondary planning of planning can cause any range of emotion like states in an existential mind. Emotion is particularly a concern in Cortical Mica systems in which free will Goals and prioritization can conflict with genetic Form expression. Also curtailment related override and erasure of Plan due to safety or authority Purpose, reduction in Plan values as a consequence Prioritization, and a measured real-time impediment to expression of Plan can cause emotion.

Q. What are the design differences between a human and non-human intelligence?
A. A human-like mind can acquire and convert objects, undefined in genetic Identity, to Platonic Forms that can be made Goals in Purpose. Consumer products are common Goals. With a new Goal, a human-like mind can learn new symbols, objects, logic and technologies to sense and control states related to the Goal. The human-like mind also has the ability to prioritize the new Goals higher than core Goals defined in genetic Identity. For example, a person can acquire a Purpose to maintain the shiny, smooth, transparent nature of a glass and silver salt shaker purchased from Tiffany’s. If a home maintenance agent were made human-like, it could choose to pursue a Goal of removing a smudge from the salt shaker and not pursue a Goal of preparing dinner or cleaning a kitchen. In short, “human-like” is the ability of a mind to deny or override its genetic Purpose.

Q. Is “free will” real?
A. Real, if an entity can add an arbitrary object not defined in genetic Identity (such as a salt shaker) to his Identity, define Goal (“right”) states for the object (such as shiny and clean), acquire goal pursuit routes and technology to sustain the Identity (such as polish and clean the shaker) and choose to pursue the acquired Goal over genetic Goals (such as polish the shaker before finding food).

Q. Is the Self an essential, immutable nucleus of the person?
A. Yes

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