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EC Container 5

Illustration: Transportation

Transportation

The stored purpose computer design anticipates that machines will augment, not replace human labor.

They have been designed to understand and serve the needs and expectations of people with great precision and subtlety. They have been designed to store analogs of human goals and experience. They have also been designed with strict controls on Purpose, goal pursuit and learning.

In short, stored purpose systems were designed to become good companions to workers.


Citation

Warren Jones, Lana Rubalsky (2010) "Illustration: Transportation", wJones Research, January 18, 2010
A family drives to a shopping area in downtown San Diego. They stop at a railroad crossing for an approaching train. When the train speedily passes before the car, another train breaks and waits. Mom works for Amtrak, so trains are a frequent family conversation topic. One of the twin teenage daughters asks, “Mother, could these two trains have collided?”

Mother responds, “I don’t think so, or at least it’s very unlikely … these trains are intelligent. The train’s engine, cars, track, aerobots and tracking satellites above are all part of a very smart metacomputer. Every part of the train’s “system” has a Purpose not to let passengers, cargo, or the people around them to come to harm.”

“If they predict any danger, they’ll just stop. But since they predict everything, they almost never need to. Between the conductor’s agent bots, the ground maintenance bots and the aerobots, the system should be able to fix anything short of an earthquake, before it ever becomes a problem.”

“But dad said it’s not possible to anticipate everything that can happen,” said the sixteen year old.

“Indeed I did,” said her father. “But it is possible to plan for everything the might happen, given causality chains for a defined set of inputs. As the available inputs increase, the system can anticipate more things. And these trains have a lot of inputs.”

“Like aerobot imagery?” said the other twin.

“And ground imagery, traffic data, weather data, reports from first responders, data from the persona agents that manage calls and web transactions. Today as soon as a farm harvester figures out picked corn is heavier than expected, the train is told to update its cargo weight estimate. When I travel, if a meeting goes late, my assistant agent automatically tells Amtrak to move me to a later train. That means a train will sometimes know I’ll be riding it, before I do.”

EC Container 6